Love: Trinitarian Love

​For much of my Christian life, the Holy Trinity has been simultaneously a central doctrine and a marginal attraction.  I would never hesitate to say, “I believe in the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit” but either out loud or to my self I quickly added, “but it’s a mystery we will never understand.”  The second phrase kept me from exploring the first one.

Of course, the Trinity is mystery, and we will never understand it.  But thankfully, a few years ago I came to see that it is a mystery intended to draw us into it, like a magnet draws iron filings to it.  I am grateful to Richard Rohr’s book, ‘The Divine Dance’ for opening the door to my knew experience of the Trinity. [1]

Simply put, the Trinity is the paradigm for everything. [2]  It is Reality revealed and expressed. As such, it is the revelation of love.  We see this in some key ways

First, the Trinity is the union of love that we explored in the last post.  Every person in the Godhead is loving itself in the other two persons because they all “are” in the others.  In this dimension it makes no sense to think of the separateness of beings in the Trinity because it is one Being. [3]. With respect to love, this means that love is singular–or as Jesus put it, the second great commandment is “like unto” the first one.  The love of God, neighbor, and self are not three loves; it is one love in three manifestations.

This is very significant because it prevents a gradation of love.  There is an odd spirituality which affirms a love for God without a corresponding love of others.  St. John squelched that idea in his first letter when he wrote, “Those who don’t love their brother or sisters whom they have seen can hardly love God whom they have not seen” (1 John 4:20). “  The Trinity says there is only one love, and it is either present or absent, real or imagined.

Second, the Trinity is the purposefulness of love.  Love is one, but not the same in every case.  We say of the Trinity that the Father creates, the Son redeems, and the Spirit sustains.  Theologically, it’s not that distinct.  But it is a revelation that love is not a generic, one-size-fits-all thing.  It manifests differently in order to achieve different purposes.  

Like the Father, some love creates, generates, and ignites.  Like the Son, some love redeems, restores, and renews.  And like the Spirit, some love sustains, preserves, and guides.  We do not have to overthink or overplan these differences.  All we have to do is love.  Love achieves its own purposes.

Third, the Trinity is the joy of love.  We must not overlook the fact that one of the early metaphors for the Trinity was a dance (perichoresis).  I have never been to a dance that lacked joy.  In fact, a dance floor is one of the most joyful places we can ever be. [4]

Some non-Christian religions use the metaphor of dance to sound the note of joy better than some Christians do.  The fourteenth-century Sufi mystic, Hafiz, wrote of 

“the God who only knows four words

And keeps repeating them, saying:

‘Come dance with Me.’ [5]

I can only ask, how does religion in general look as a dance?  How does Christianity look with a dancing Trinity?   How does love look when it only knows four words, “Come dance with me” ?

In these ways, and more, the Trinity is the lens through Whom we look to see the nature and expression of love.  And because we are made in the image of God, we can manifest this kind of love in our humanity.

 

[1] Richard Rohr, ‘The Divine Dance’ (Whitaker House, 2016)

[2] Rohr’s book develops this idea in a wide variety of subjects.

[3] This is why Christianity is a monotheistic religion.  

[4] Amazing, isn’t it, that with this understanding of the Trinity, any Christians could have been against dancing.  The prohibition comes from a “ joy stealing” spirituality rather than a joy-infusing one, and may reveal the person’s lack of restraint more than it does dancing itself.

[5] Part of a longer reflection in “Matthew Fox’s Daily Meditations,” October 6, 2019.

About Steve Harper

Retired seminary professor, who taught for 32 years in the disciplines of Spiritual Formation and Wesley Studies. Author and co-author of 42 books. Also a retired Elder in The Florida Annual Conference of The United Methodist Church.
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